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Pet Surgery at Pet First Veterinary Clinic: Understanding the Process

When you bring your pet in for surgery, the first thing that will happen is a thorough physical examination from head to tail by the veterinarian. If blood work was requested, a blood sample will be collected to check the pet’s overall health and ensure there are no contraindications to proceeding with the procedure.

When you bring your pet in for surgery, the first thing that will happen is a thorough physical examination from head to tail by the veterinarian. If blood work was requested, a blood sample will be collected to check the pet’s overall health and ensure there are no contraindications to proceeding with the procedure.

When you bring your pet in for surgery, the first thing that will happen is a thorough physical examination from head to tail by the veterinarian. If blood work was requested, a blood sample will be collected to check the pet’s overall health and ensure there are no contraindications to proceeding with the procedure. If the results are good, pre-anesthetic medications will be administered to reduce anxiety, sedate the pet, regulate heart function, and provide pain control.

It is highly recommended that all pets undergoing general anesthesia receive fluid therapy via intravenous catheterization. This helps maintain blood pressure, replaces lost fluids, and reduces the risk of anesthetic-related health problems. If you have agreed to this service, intravenous fluid therapy will be started, and an intravenous catheter will be inserted to allow the administration of medication directly into the pet’s vein in case of an emergency.

Once premedication, intravenous catheterization, and fluid therapy have begun, the pet will be induced with an injectable anesthetic. This puts the pet into a light sleep, allowing an endotracheal tube to be placed into the trachea to maintain an open airway, facilitate ventilation of the lungs, and prevent the possibility of asphyxiation or airway obstruction while under anesthesia.

The pet will then be connected to an anesthetic machine that provides oxygen and an inhaled anesthetic gas called isoflurane, which is very safe and commonly used in humans. Before surgery, the area will be prepared by eliminating as many bacteria as possible through shaving, washing, and chemical disinfection. Sterile surgical instruments will be used, which have been thoroughly disinfected and sterilized via autoclave.

Throughout the surgery, the pet will receive constant monitoring by a qualified veterinary technician, who will monitor heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, ECG, pulse oximetry, and end-tidal CO2 levels. Special warming bags will be used to ensure the pet maintains its body temperature, and adequate pain control will be provided to help with a smooth, pain-free recovery.

After surgery, the pet will be continually monitored by a technician or veterinarian to manage its recovery. The endotracheal tube will be removed when the pet is awake enough to swallow, and it will be placed in a warm cage with blankets and warm bags to keep it comfortable and restore proper body temperature. The pet will receive frequent examinations throughout the day to ensure it is comfortable.

When it’s time for your pet to go home, the technician or doctor will provide you with all the necessary information and pain control to help keep your pet comfortable during recovery at home. A follow-up appointment will be scheduled to ensure that the pet is recovering as expected. If you have any questions or concerns, you can call us directly to talk with a doctor for information and/or assistance.

At Pet First Veterinary Clinic, our objective is to provide optimum care and follow-up to all pets having elective surgery in our clinic. We understand that having your pet undergo surgery can be a stressful experience, but we strive to make it as safe and comfortable as possible for both you and your furry friend.

Dr. Alexandra Gulinescu

Dr. Alexandra Gulinescu

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